The Blue Lagoon… Again!

As my travels in Iceland drew to a close, there was really only one thing that I had to do.

Visit the Blue Lagoon again of course!

I had visited the Blue Lagoon previously, during my 2014 Iceland trip, and despite it being the biggest tourist attraction in Iceland – I just had to go back!

The Blue Lagoon is yet another Icelandic geothermal wonder. Located just a stones throw from the international airport Keflavik, the lagoon is easily experienced as either your first or last stop in Iceland, depending on your flight schedule.

The Blue Lagoon formed following the construction of a new geothermal power plant around 40 years ago. People soon began bathing in the geothermal waters and after applying the silica mud to their skin, those with severe skin conditions (psoriasis especially) began noticing big improvements. Several years later it opened as a public bath and has continued to become more and more famous and world renowned as time has gone by! It is currently recognised as one of the 25 ‘Wonders of the World’.

People with severe skin conditions tend to stay in the lagoon hotel and spend almost all of their time bathing in the water to help improve their skin, but majority of visitors to the lagoon are only there for a day, wanting to see the beautiful water and experience a warm escape from the cold Icelandic climate.

I wanted to visit again as I had loved it so much the first time and found it the perfect way to end my amazing Icelandic adventure.

It is only a 40 (ish) minute drive to the lagoon from Reykjavik city centre, and only about 5 minutes away from Keflavik international airport.

Once at the lagoon there are several different options regarding tickets. The standard entrance ticket with no extras goes for around 40€ and there are several other packages available, each with more inclusions, right up to the 195€ luxury pass.

Once you have purchased your ticket, you will be given a coloured armband which allows you to store your valuables safely in a locker, and also lets you purchase drinks from the lagoon bar. Once you leave the lagoon your armband is checked and you pay the balance as you exit.

It is also handy to know that it is expected that you shower in the nude before you enter the lagoon. There are separate changing rooms for males and females, and once in your designated changing room there is very little privacy. However, this is Iceland, and nudity before entering all public lagoons and pools is an expectation, part of the culture and really not a big deal.

I tend to be a bit self conscious of my body but in Iceland I really couldn’t care less! The locals don’t care what my naked body looks like, so why should I?

After all that it was finally time to jump in the water and enjoy!

I visited on a super foggy and misty day so unfortunately wasn’t able to take any pictures that did the place justice. I also didn’t want to risk dropping (and killing) the SLR so only my little point and click camera came into the water with me.

The day I visited was super busy, but thanks to the heavy mist, you wouldn’t have to go too far to have a little section of the lagoon that felt like it was all yours.

After floating aimlessly for a while I began to get a little peckish, so decided to swim up to the bar and see what was on offer. There is multiple types of booze available, soft drinks, juices and water, but the best thing available?

Skyr smoothies!

Skyr is one of the most delicious things you can try while you are in Iceland. It is a dairy product, that is kinda like halfway between a cheese and a strained yoghurt. Texture-wise, it is thicker than a regular greek yoghurt, but taste-wise it has a much milder and slightly sweeter flavour than a strained yoghurt. It is a very popular breakfast item in Iceland and is definitely worth trying!

As I found out, it also makes for delicious smoothies!

After knocking back a few glasses of wine (because why not) and several Skyr smoothies (because there are worse things to be addicted to) it was time for me to leave the lagoon and not only that, it was time to leave Iceland too.

I was definitely sad to leave Iceland – but I wasn’t miserable, because I know I will make it back there in the (not so distant) future. Not only that, I wasn’t leaving Iceland to go back to the home base, I was heading on to wonderful Scotland.

T H E   L O W D O W N
Getting to the Blue Lagoon: An easy drive from the airport or city centre, if you will not have a car there are plenty of regular shuttles to and from the lagoon
The Blue Lagoon: The Lagoon is becoming more and more popular – make sure you book ahead
Camera: Waterproof Nikon Coolpix S810C
Threads: My adorable bikini is from the Australian label Tigerlily
Remember: Book ahead, bring bathers and try the Skyr!

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20-something year old Australian backpacker writing her way around the world.

65 thoughts on “The Blue Lagoon… Again!

      1. No specific plans yet, but I will definitely go back…especially if I ever book a flight with Icelandair since you can easily do the free stopovers. I went in summer last time, so I’d really like to try a winter trip.

  1. Great review. We are really not into spas and such but went thereon a whim and loved it. We had to just about tear ourselves away. I’m glad you enjoyed it and can’t wait to see Scotland. (No photo with a mud mask???)

  2. “Healing waters” always seem to be a major draw. Throw in scenic beauty and you obviously have a winner, although baths starting at 40 euros seems a little steep. I once visited Hot Springs, Arkansas that developed a whole industry around its hot springs. Huge buildings were packed with all sorts of equipment. —Curt

  3. The Blue Lagoon and a few glasses of wine sounds like a perfect day! I will have to try that if I ever make it back 🙂 Another trip is the best way to get over post-travel blues! Planning it back to back is a smart move.

  4. Skyr smoothies! Yummy. They definitely did not have those when I went in 2009. Even though all my Icelandic friends tell me that the Blue Lagoon is just for tourists and the locals don’t go there (because it’s so expensive), I will go back like you did when I get the chance to go to Iceland one day again. xx

  5. For seasoned travelers, sometimes it’s tempting to avoid the crowds that are inherent and unavoidable at popular tourist places. But then again, we need to remind ourselves (or at least I do) that these places are popular for a reason. I have this issue sometimes in Yosemite National Park. I avoided Yosemite Valley for almost a decade. When I finally returned, I focused on the positives -the landscape, the waterfalls, the granite domes – and enjoyed it so much more. Still not a fan of the crowds, but that’s what meditation and deep breathing are for. 🙂 I’m glad you returned to the lagoon and thanks for sharing your experiences with us.

  6. Great pics – very interesting post exposing (pardon the pun) different attitudes to nudity…wonder where different cultures diverged? There is a place called hot water beach in NZ which is a real tourist trap and you get lots of people digging holes and sitting in them in one section of beach where the hot spring runs into the sand…I really hate places that draw huge crowds like that as a rule and love the feeling of isolation where I can get it so the misty day sounds great!

  7. I am new to your site, and will certainly enjoy reading both past blogs and your ongoing fare. Iceland is presently on my radar screen for Summer, 2018, along with certain stops in several places across Europe. I can tell it will be a fascinating visit.

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